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And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev

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And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
And again at the conductor's stand Rasul Klychev
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Vyacheslav Sarkisyan

At the Mukams Palace of the State Cultural Center of Turkmenistan, the musicians of the State Symphony Orchestra conducted by Rasul Klychev gave a concert called “From the New World”.

As Rasul Klychev explained to the audience, this name for the concert was taken in connection with the move of the Czech composer Antonin Dvorak to America. Dvorak's Symphony No. 9 was performed for Ashgabat lovers of classical music. “I would not have written this composition if I had not seen America,” Dvorak himself said. Therefore, Symphony No. 9 is often called "From the New World".

Lively, bright, unpredictable music sounded from the stage in high-speed rhythms, as if in 1893 the composer was walking the streets of New York and at the same time sharing his impressions of what he saw with the audience.

The concert program included two more works by world-famous American composer Leorand Bernstein: "Candide" - a similar version of Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" and "West Side Story". The part of Tony in Candida was performed by Nury Nuryev, the part of Maria was performed by the Honored Artist of Turkmenistan Bibidzhemal Amanova. The performers artistically approached the performance, presenting the audience with a sincerely in love couple.

The incendiary music of West Side Story, in which classical compositions are intertwined with jazz and Latin American rhythms, literally ignited the listeners. The hall began to sing to the beat of the music and in the finale gave the musicians a long standing ovation. In gratitude for such a reception, the orchestra members performed an encore of one of the fragments of this work.

In a traditional address to the public, Rasul Klychev reminded that the next meeting would be quite soon - on October 8 and 9, a concert dedicated to the wonderful songwriter Arno Babajanyan would take place.